vow muse

Vow Muse in The Wall Street Journal

Vow Muse in The Wall Street Journal

Holy guacamole. Hard as it is to toot our own horn, we can't keep this one in. Vow Muse was featured in a Wall Street Journal article about how millennials are ditching tradition in favor of more personal, customized weddings! Part of that trend includes creating a wedding ceremony and wedding vows that truly reflects the couple and their community.

Real Weddings: Jennifer & Kyle

Real Weddings: Jennifer & Kyle

Jennifer was looking for a secular officiant as well as help creating memorable vows. After getting to know them as a couple and as individuals, we set to work crafting their custom ceremony to reflect and honor their decade long relationship, while weaving in some unique tributes. One of our faves was quoting a beloved Harry Potter character: 

4 Unexpected Benefits of Saying “Yes!” to the Maid of Honor Gig

Til Death Do Us Party

Til Death Do Us Party

I’ve done the maid of honor thing from both sides of the aisle: I’ve been one and I’ve asked someone to be mine. So I know the costs add up fast between a dress (that you can wear again, fingers crossed!), shoes, maybe a plane ticket, a bachelorette party, a bridal shower, the time it takes to organize all of the above… you know what? I’m gonna stop there. It’s not just pricey, it’s also a  ton of work, and I hope your best buddy is super crazy grateful for all the time and effort and money you’re putting into being there for them. For moments when the stress is getting to you, I’ve compiled the major benefits to keep you sane:You get to taste all the things.

I knew the part of wedding planning I’d really excel at would be cake tasting. I was not wrong. And when you’re the maid of honor, you get to cake taste, too. You can also dinner taste. I maybe possibly tracked down the drinks vendor and  wine tasted as a maid of honor (this is definitely a thing, so if you start telling people about it and they say they’ve never heard of a wedding party doing this, send them my way). And I actually managed to do all this from half a country away! My commitments to friends and food are strong. If you’re in the same city as your engaged friend, I enthusiastically recommend you tag along and eat everything you are allowed to and really help narrow down the menu. If, like me, you are many states away, then track down the closest alternatives and eat them in support over the phone while the couple talks over the options. In a stressful moment, you can always return to your local bakery in the name of “helping.”

You know that updo you’ve always wanted?

Whether someone has been hired to do hair and makeup or the wedding party is tackling this job solo, this is an awesome time to get together (face-to-face or over Skype) and go through online tutorials for looks you’ve always wanted to try and never had the time/energy/boldness to really put effort into. Here are real-life things I real-life tried as maid of honor: contouring (not for me), cat eyeliner (lots of yes), fake eyelashes (changed my life), and milkmaid braids (also not for me and broke my heart to realize it). I would not have called myself make-up-ly competent before doing all this online with my best friend before her wedding, but it turns out practice really does make perfect.

You can’t imagine how memorable getting ready together is.

Obviously you can get ready with whoever you want day-of, and maybe the engaged couple wants to only get ready with each other (support!), but if you're invited to get ready together the day of the wedding, I would take it. My most cherished memory of my best friend’s wedding is helping her mom zip her into her dress and then walking her to the courthouse. We sat in a quiet, small room together while we waited for the ceremony to start. Nothing big happened during that moment. But we were together, right before she was going to get married, and I had put her shoes on her feet when she couldn’t see over her dress. It was emotional in ways I wasn’t expecting.

What goes around comes around in weddingland.

I didn’t know it when I was maid of honor for my best friend, but about a year after her emotional courthouse wedding, she was maid of honor for me. She called me every time I seem stressed, she didn’t think I was silly when I discovered a deep love for picking out tablecloths, and we of course ate more cake. The day of the wedding, after our makeup and hair were done, she had her new husband bring us garlic fries and then did dramatic readings from gossip magazines until I was in tears laughing. (There are photos of it — I have them saved to my desktop and look at them often.)

Final tally on being a maid of honor: It’s totally work, and it’s totally stressful, but in the end? Totally worth it.

Have you been a maid of honor? Had a great one? What were your favorite parts?

Sara Kendall lives in Redwood City with her husband and dog. Her main hobbies are coffee, books, and musicals.

Vow Muse in the New York Times!

NYT Logo

NYT Logo

NYT Article

NYT Article

We were so excited when Bruce Feiler, author of (among other things) the This Life column in the Fashion & Style section of the New York Times, contacted us about a story he was doing on toast whisperers. The article was published in last Sunday's edition of the NYT where we were featured alongside some other really great companies, such as New York-based Oratory Laboratory.

Since the morning the article came out, the inquiries have been flooding in -- we look forward to working with so many new and amazing clients this summer (and fall... and winter...)!

Here is the photo of us featured in the article, as well as a couple others from the photo shoot we did with the NYT photographer, Peter Earl McCollough.

NYT Photo by Peter Earl McCollough

NYT Photo by Peter Earl McCollough

Alicia Ostarello and Angie Sommer, writers and co-founders of Vow Muse, a writing business focused on custom marriage vows and speeches, Oakland, Calif., May 27, 2015. Credit: Peter Earl McCollough

Alicia Ostarello and Angie Sommer, writers and co-founders of Vow Muse, a writing business focused on custom marriage vows and speeches, Oakland, Calif., May 27, 2015. Credit: Peter Earl McCollough

Angie Sommer and Alicia Ostarello, writers and co-founders of Vow Muse, a writing business focused on custom marriage vows and speeches, Oakland, Calif., May 27, 2015. Credit: Peter Earl McCollough

Angie Sommer and Alicia Ostarello, writers and co-founders of Vow Muse, a writing business focused on custom marriage vows and speeches, Oakland, Calif., May 27, 2015. Credit: Peter Earl McCollough